News – The Daily Californian https://www.dailycal.org Berkeley's News Mon, 27 Jan 2020 17:18:40 -0800 en-US hourly 1 32643161 UC Berkeley study highlights effects of unsolved Oakland homicides https://www.dailycal.org/2020/01/27/uc-berkeley-study-highlights-effects-of-unsolved-oakland-homicides/ https://www.dailycal.org/2020/01/27/uc-berkeley-study-highlights-effects-of-unsolved-oakland-homicides/#respond Mon, 27 Jan 2020 11:01:39 +0000 https://www.dailycal.org/?p=527281 UC Berkeley study highlights effects of unsolved Oakland homicides

UC Berkeley’s International Human Rights Law Clinic released a study Thursday examining the impact unsolved homicides in Oakland and barriers to support services have on the families of victims from underrepresented communities.
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UC Berkeley study highlights effects of unsolved Oakland homicides

Sunny Shen/Staff

UC Berkeley’s International Human Rights Law Clinic released a study Thursday examining the impact unsolved homicides in Oakland and barriers to support services have on the families of victims from underrepresented communities.

Researchers worked with the families of victims of unsolved homicides to measure the impact that “impunity,” or a failure to bring perpetrators to justice, has on their lasting trauma. The study found that fewer arrests are made in cases involving victims from underrepresented communities and that the families of those victims often face greater difficulty accessing state support services and face “disrespectful and discriminatory treatment” from police.

“There are a large number of studies that examine why police fail to solve murders,” said Roxanna Altholz, co-director of the Human Rights Law Clinic and author of the study in an email. “This study examines a different question: how the failure to solve a murder impact family members living in communities where the majority of murders are not solved.”

The state of California provides victims of crimes, such as the families of homicide victims, with financial assistance for expenses including funeral, medical and mental health costs and relocating, according to Altholz. Police have the discretion to block access to that assistance if they conclude that families were somehow involved with the death or that they failed to cooperate with an investigation.

None of the families interviewed during this study were notified by law enforcement of their rights to these support services, according to Altholz.

“Addressing the impact of unsolved murders falls to community-based organizations that have limited resources and are understaffed,” Altholz said in the email. “The individuals who have spearheaded outreach to families of homicide victims in Oakland include the mothers of homicide victims who volunteer their time and have shoe string budgets.”

Oakland has maintained one of the nation’s highest violent crime rates since the 1990s, and the Oakland Police Department has more than 2,000 unsolved homicide cases in its books, according to the study. In the last 10 years, approximately 76% of homicides involved victims who were Black, but arrests were made in only 40% of those cases. In contrast, 80% of cases involving white victims resulted in arrests.

The study also found that arrests are much less frequent in neighborhoods with the highest murder rates. From 2000 to 2018, Oakland police made arrests in 40% of murder cases — far below the state average of 58%. In certain areas, less than one in three homicides resulted in an arrest during the last decade.

“The police must improve the treatment of families at the crime scene and during the investigation,” Altholz said in the email. “Access services should not depend on the police nor should help be conditioned on family members’ cooperation with the investigation or whether they lack a criminal record.”

As of press time, the Oakland Police Department has not responded to our request for comment.

Contact Jake Souza at jsouza@dailycal.org and follow him on Twitter at @jsouza_dailycal.

The Daily Californian

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Free Speech Movement Cafe celebrates 20 years at UC Berkeley https://www.dailycal.org/2020/01/26/free-speech-movement-cafe-celebrates-20-years-at-uc-berkeley/ https://www.dailycal.org/2020/01/26/free-speech-movement-cafe-celebrates-20-years-at-uc-berkeley/#respond Mon, 27 Jan 2020 01:23:42 +0000 https://www.dailycal.org/?p=527192 Free Speech Movement Cafe celebrates 20 years at UC Berkeley

The Free Speech Movement Cafe, located in Moffitt Library, celebrated its 20th anniversary Friday since opening in 2000. For the first half of the day, the café offered free drinks, stickers and t-shirts to anyone who stopped by.
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Free Speech Movement Cafe celebrates 20 years at UC Berkeley

Brianna Luna/Staff

On Friday, the Free Speech Movement Cafe, located in Moffitt Library, celebrated its 20th anniversary since opening in 2000.

For the first half of the day, the café, better known as the FSM, offered free drinks, stickers and t-shirts to anyone who stopped by. Daryl Ross, campus alumnus and owner of the café, said the event was a way for the café to thank the Berkeley community.

“It’s just super exciting that we’ve been around for 20 years and been a part of students’ lives and been commemorating the Free Speech Movement for that long,” Ross said.

The café is decorated with plaques commemorating key moments of the campus Free Speech Movement. One plaque mentions that the café is dedicated to the memory of Mario Savio, whose “leadership inspired thousands of fellow Berkeley students.”

In fall 1964, thousands of campus students protested at Sproul Hall after campus administration banned political expression on Sproul Plaza. Savio then made his famous “Operation of the Machine” speech on Sproul’s steps, calling for expanded free speech on campus. His acts of civil disobedience were pivotal moments for the campus Free Speech Movement.

Ross said he admired Savio’s actions when he was on campus majoring in philosophy, but felt the movement had died down by the 1980s. Those involved in the Free Speech Movement inspired him and others to establish the café because people like Ross wanted to publicly spread awareness of the movement to future generations.

UC Berkeley hosts the Mario Savio Memorial Lecture and Young Activist Award annually in memory of Savio. Ross said the café’s main donor, campus alumnus Stephen Silberstein, was a friend of Savio’s who also took part in the campus Free Speech Movement. Ross also mentioned that Savio’s son worked at the café.

“It was an amazing privilege to be able to run the place,” Ross said. “We have sustainable ingredients and we were the first independently owned place on campus to give people $15 an hour — two years before that minimum wage was decreed — because I believe in those ideals.”

Outside the café, near the end of the event, the Cal Band performed a set including the traditional campus game songs “Fight for California,” “Big C” and “Sons of California.”

Dorothy Bechler, campus junior and student director for Cal Band, said the band hoped to bring Cal spirit to the anniversary.

“(The FSM) is a big café on campus; it’s a fun staple to late-night studying,” Bechler said.

Campus sophomore Alya Wilkinson-Hayat was one of many students and community members who waited in line to get free coffee. She said she frequents the café about once every week because of its convenient location and diverse options.

“The FSM café is giving ode to the history of activism on campus,” Wilkinson-Hayat said.

Olivia Buccieri is the lead business and economy reporter. Contact her at obuccieri@dailycal.org and follow her on Twitter at @obuccieri_dc‏.

The Daily Californian

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Berkeley Forum announces spring 2020 lineup of speakers, panels https://www.dailycal.org/2020/01/27/berkeley-forum-announces-spring-2020-lineup-of-speakers-panels/ https://www.dailycal.org/2020/01/27/berkeley-forum-announces-spring-2020-lineup-of-speakers-panels/#respond Mon, 27 Jan 2020 10:56:59 +0000 https://www.dailycal.org/?p=527316 Berkeley Forum announces spring 2020 lineup of speakers, panels

Every semester, the Berkeley Forum hosts a series of panels and speakers, all on a variety of timely topics and featuring significant community members.
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Berkeley Forum announces spring 2020 lineup of speakers, panels

Wikimedia/Creative Commons

Every semester, the Berkeley Forum hosts a series of panels and speakers, all on a variety of timely topics and featuring significant community members.

This semester — during which the organization will host activists, executives from major companies and social media stars — is no different. Students in the campus organization spent the entire previous semester finding and organizing this semester’s speakers on a variety of topics relevant to today, according to Charlie McMurry, campus junior and Berkeley Forum president.

“From entrepreneurs to activists, I think there is something for everyone in our lineup of distinguished speakers,” McMurry said. “These events will address some of the most important topics and discussions this world faces right now.”

McMurry added that the Berkeley Forum’s mission is to keep the events free and accessible for everyone. He also said he hopes more people attend a Berkeley Forum event for the first time this semester.

The tickets for the events will be available through Berkeley Forum’s Facebook event posts. All the events are free for the public.

Rebecca Nagle, two-spirit Cherokee activist

Rebecca Nagle is an indigenous activist who is a citizen of the Cherokee Nation. She identifies as a two-spirit/queer woman and writes about Native representation and tribal sovereignty. Nagle is also known for her work against rape culture and promoting consent.

On top of her activism, Nagle is a podcast host and writer. In 2013, Nagle was named one of Fast Company’s 100 Most Creative People for her project “FORCE: Upsetting Rape Culture.”

Nagle will be speaking at the Berkeley Forum’s event on Thursday, Feb. 6 — its first event of the semester.

Ien Chi, creative director of Jubilee

Ien Chi is the creative director of Jubilee, a popular YouTube channel with more than 4.5 million subscribers. The channel promotes a belief in “the power of empathy for human good,” according to the channel’s description on YouTube.

Before Jubilee, Chi worked for many major companies including Apple, NASA and NBC. His work has accumulated more than 750 million views collectively, according to his website.

Chi will speak at the Berkeley Forum on Monday, Feb. 10.

Christian Picciolini, founder of the Free Radicals Project

Christian Picciolini is a television producer and author who founded the Free Radicals Project, an organization that works against extremist groups and disengages their members across the globe.

Picciolini was a part of the “white-power” movement himself, before he left the organization in the 1980s. He now spends his time with the Free Radicals Project, writing books advocating for peace and against hate and giving talks about peacemaking and compassion.

Picciolini will speak at the Berkeley Forum on Tuesday, Feb. 25.

Tim Chau, owner of 3.14 (pi) on Instagram

Tim Chau, the owner of popular account 3.14 (pi), has more than 5 million Instagram followers from his accumulation of memes on the social media site.

He raises awareness surrounding refugee situations, mental health stigmas, social rights and politics with his posts. Chau has also released a documentary film, “Share,” which highlights issues of identity, sexuality, family and communication.

Chau will be speaking at the Berkeley Forum on Thursday, Feb. 27.

Bias in Machine Learning panel

The Berkeley Forum will host a Bias in Machine Learning panel Monday, March 2, on the field of machine learning algorithms and their potential social biases. These biases may target certain races, sexes or other demographics.

According to McMurry, the panelists for this event have not been confirmed yet.

Affirmative Action debate

The Berkeley Forum will be holding a debate on affirmative action Thursday, March 5.

In 1996, California banned affirmative action through Proposition 209, which prohibits public schools, such as the UC system, from considering race, sex or ethnicity in admissions decisions. The topic has become especially controversial in recent years, especially because of UC and campus initiatives to promote diversity across the system.

According to McMurry, the people on the debate stage will include Public Advocates senior staff attorney Nicole Ochi, former ACLU lawyer and current president of the New York Civil Rights Coalition Michael Meyers, and Florida’s District 7 Congressional candidate and member of the Republican Party Yukong Zhao. One additional speaker has yet to be determined.

Andrew Kortina, co-founder of Venmo

Andrew Kortina founded Venmo, the popular virtual payment app, after randomly being paired with his roommate and future business partner Iqram Magdon-Ismail on his very first day at the University of Pennsylvania, where he majored in creative writing and philosophy.

Venmo which debuted in 2009 — was not the first company that Kortina and Magdon-Ismail founded. They also started a website for college classifieds known as My Campus Post.

Kortina will be speaking at the Berkeley Forum on campus Wednesday, March 11.

Doug Freeman, COO of Patagonia

Campus alumnus Doug Freeman has been the chief operating officer of California-based company Patagonia since May 2007.

Patagonia works to promote fair labor practices and reduce the social and environmental footprints of its products, according to its website. Prior to this position, Freeman worked as Patagonia’s sourcing manager for Asia, The North Face’s sourcing director and Nautica’s sourcing manager.

He graduated from UC Berkeley with a degree in English literature in 1985.

Freeman will be speaking at the Berkeley Forum on Tuesday, March 17.

Alice Wong, founder and director of the Disability Visibility Project

Disability rights activist Alice Wong is the founder and director of Disability Visibility Project, an online community that works to empower individuals with disabilities to connect and share their stories. The community also serves to heighten awareness surrounding disability media and culture. She also works on other projects, including Access Is Love, DisabledWriters.com, the #CripLit and #CripTheVote Twitter movements and the Disability Visibility podcast.

In 2013, she was appointed by former president Barack Obama to serve on the National Council on Disability.

Wong will be speaking at the Berkeley Forum on campus Monday, April 6.

Hong Kong Protests panel

The Berkeley Forum is hosting a panel on the Hong Kong protests Thursday, April 23. The Hong Kong protests, which have been ongoing since March 2019, have garnered international attention. Millions of people have taken to the streets in protest against Hong Kong citizens’ extradition to mainland China, as well as the role the Chinese government plays in Hong Kong society.

According to McMurry, the speakers on the panel will include University of Notre Dame political science professor Victoria Hui, Hong Kong Free Press writer Dan Garrett and former Hong Kong lawmaker Au-Nok Hin.

Barry Levenson, founder and curator of the National Mustard Museum

In 1992, Barry Levenson quit his job as the state of Wisconsin’s assistant attorney and left behind his long-term career as an accomplished lawyer to open one of Wisconsin’s most popular attractions: a free mustard museum.

When he is not collecting mustard from around the world or orchestrating the World-Wide Mustard Competition, Levenson is an adjunct professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, lecturing on food law.

Levenson will be speaking at the Berkeley Forum on Tuesday, April 28.

Steven Lim, former BuzzFeed producer

Former BuzzFeed producer Steven Lim has branched out on his own with two of his ex-BuzzFeed colleagues this month, serving as co-founder of Watcher Entertainment, a new digital brand.

Lim is an Ohio State University chemical engineering graduate by study and producer by practice. Lim served as BuzzFeed’s executive producer from 2017-19, where he created and hosted “Worth It” — BuzzFeed’s popular food show — and Asian Bachelorette 2.

Lim is tentatively scheduled for the semester, and this event’s date is still to be announced.

Alaleh Kianerci, deputy district attorney of People v. Brock Turner (2016)

Alaleh Kianerci is the Santa Clara deputy district attorney who garnered the national spotlight for her work on the 2016 People v. Brock Turner case.

In People v. Brock Turner, 20-year-old Stanford University swimmer Brock Turner was convicted of three counts of felony sexual assault. After this case, Kianerci worked to toughen the penalties for sexually assaulting an unconscious individual.

Kianerci is tentatively scheduled for the semester, and this event’s date is still to be announced.

Contact Kate Finman and Skylar Schoemig at newsdesk@dailycal.org.

The Daily Californian

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UC Berkeley researchers find pasta can help build assistive robots https://www.dailycal.org/2020/01/27/uc-berkeley-researchers-find-pasta-can-help-build-assistive-robots/ https://www.dailycal.org/2020/01/27/uc-berkeley-researchers-find-pasta-can-help-build-assistive-robots/#respond Mon, 27 Jan 2020 11:04:50 +0000 https://www.dailycal.org/?p=527217 UC Berkeley researchers find pasta can help build assistive robots

UC Berkeley professor of mechanical engineering Oliver O’Reilly and campus graduate mechanical engineering student Nathaniel Goldberg constructed a model showing changes in the shape of spaghetti after it is placed in water, which could help researchers create more human-like robots.
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UC Berkeley researchers find pasta can help build assistive robots

Vanessa Lim/Staff

UC Berkeley professor of mechanical engineering Oliver O’Reilly and campus graduate mechanical engineering student Nathaniel Goldberg constructed a model showing changes in the shape of spaghetti after it is placed in water, which could help researchers create more human-like robots.

Published in Physical Review, the study indicates that water can transform dry, stiff pasta into a more flexible material. Observing these changes helped the researchers understand how robots — which are often made from soft materials like rubber or silicon — can be manipulated in relation to different temperatures and environments, according to Berkeley News.

Ultimately, their findings will allow researchers to build models that better reflect the movement of living organisms, including humans. In health care, for example, robots with increased mobility could be used to assist doctors in the operating room, with the ability to pick up a variety of sensitive surgical instruments.

“We propose a minimal model for the cooking-induced deformation of spaghetti and related food products,” the study states. “We use our model to investigate the cooking of a single strand of spaghetti confined to a pot and reproduce a curious three-stage deformation sequence that arises in the cooking process.”

In order to help test malleability, O’Reilly and Goldberg took a single strand of spaghetti and placed it in a pot of room temperature water while measuring the physical changes of the strand over the span of two hours.

Taking a wide variety of factors into account — ranging from diameter to density  the model is able to predict the changes in the spaghetti’s physical shape. The same predictions can also be applied to materials such as silicone or rubber, which are often used to build assistive robots.

“(Studying spaghetti works) as stepping stones to much more complicated things,” O’Reilly said in a Berkeley News article. “It forces you to think about things differently.”

This discovery also revealed the extent to which small findings can be explained and translated into mathematics, O’Reilly and Goldberg said in an American Physical Society press release.

Additionally, while O’Reilly and Goldberg are not planning to further study spaghetti, they are continuing to study how rods interact with different surfaces, according to the release.

Contact Audry Jeong at ajeong@dailycal.org and follow her on Twitter at @audryjng_dc.

The Daily Californian

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Berkeley City Council votes to establish outdoor emergency shelter https://www.dailycal.org/2020/01/23/berkeley-city-council-votes-to-establish-outdoor-emergency-shelter/ https://www.dailycal.org/2020/01/23/berkeley-city-council-votes-to-establish-outdoor-emergency-shelter/#respond Fri, 24 Jan 2020 07:06:40 +0000 https://www.dailycal.org/?p=527019 Berkeley City Council votes to establish outdoor emergency shelter

Berkeley City Council voted to establish an outdoor emergency shelter in response to the declaration of a shelter emergency in the city of Berkeley, the potential deaths of several unhoused people and hygiene concerns for the community.
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Berkeley City Council votes to establish outdoor emergency shelter

Rigel Robinson/Courtesy

Berkeley City Council voted to establish an outdoor emergency shelter in response to the declaration of a shelter emergency in the city of Berkeley, the potential deaths of several unhoused people and hygiene concerns for the community.

The shelters will be composed of climate-controlled, sturdy tents and will likely be elevated from the ground. Shelters will provide handwashing facilities, showers and other sanitation services, and will operate with a solar-powered system. The shelters will also be supervised and managed by an agency.

People will be selected according to city manager protocol to stay in the emergency shelters based on shelter selection criteria. The tents, however, are intended as temporary housing and occupants are encouraged to stay no longer than 180 days.

“Placement in an indoor navigation center or permanent housing are more appropriate mid- and long-term options,” according to the City Council agenda item.

Several locations have been suggested for the emergency outdoor shelters, including 611 to 639 on University Avenue, a largely unused lot under the bridge and adjacent to the already existing encampment beside the Interstate 80 freeway. The area south of pathways on Cedar Street is also being considered.

People’s Park Committee member Lisa Teague said an outdoor shelter is a more viable option for unhoused people who often can’t occupy traditional shelters, which generally cannot accommodate adequate belongings and companion animals.

Berkeley Homeless Commissioner Aidan Hill was concerned over the need for supervision, which they believe may prolong the building process and increase expenses.

“I would say the outdoor emergency shelter right now doesn’t have dialogue and trust as primary components to it,” Hill said. “It assumes that the government is really going to solve the solution for people. … The reality is unhoused people are completely resilient and self-reliable.”

The emergency outdoor shelter will work in tandem with the 1000 Person Plan, which aims to permanently end homelessness in Berkeley.

Contact Devaki Dikshit at ddikshit@dailycal.org and follow them on Twitter at @DevakiDevay.

The Daily Californian

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‘He brought trust back to the school’: Former Berkeley High School principal Jim Slemp dies https://www.dailycal.org/2020/01/26/he-brought-trust-back-to-the-school-former-berkeley-high-school-principal-jim-slemp-dies/ https://www.dailycal.org/2020/01/26/he-brought-trust-back-to-the-school-former-berkeley-high-school-principal-jim-slemp-dies/#respond Mon, 27 Jan 2020 02:38:23 +0000 https://www.dailycal.org/?p=527199 ‘He brought trust back to the school’: Former Berkeley High School principal Jim Slemp dies

Former principal of Berkeley High School Jim Slemp died in Oregon on Jan. 7. Slemp was the BHS principal for seven years.
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‘He brought trust back to the school’: Former Berkeley High School principal Jim Slemp dies

Mark Coplan/Courtesy

Former principal of Berkeley High School, or BHS, Jim Slemp died in Oregon on Jan. 7.

Slemp left the Eugene School District in Oregon in 2003 and was the principal of BHS for seven years until 2010. During his time at BHS, Slemp was an avid advocate for smaller schools and addressing the achievement gap of students of color, as well as racism, at BHS. Slemp felt it was important that schools were smaller to allow for a more caring experience and to address the achievement gap.

“He was the first principal I know that had parents and teachers shadow students in their day,” said Berkeley Unified School District, or BUSD, director Beatriz Leyva-Cutler in an email. “This for everyone made a difference.”

According to Leyva-Cutler, Slemp opened up discussions on racism and the achievement gap with parents and students.

Former BHS science teacher Evy Kavaler added how Slemp helped improve BHS.

“When he came to Berkeley High, Berkeley High was a mess. We had a lot of different principals, pretty much every year, some of them didn’t last a year,” Kavaler said. “He put a lot of time and effort into the school and made it into a better place.”

Slemp made a significant impact on BHS by connecting with students and bringing the BHS community together. Both Leyva-Cutler and Kavaler said Slemp’s presence and policies during a period in which BHS had many short-term principals helped change that environment.

According to Kavaler, Slemp would often talk to students in the courtyard and invite people into his office, where they would discuss new ideas about the school.

“He was a very approachable person, he was very personable. He talked to students, he talked to teachers,” Kavaler added.

Slemp was involved in programs such as the BHS Development Group, a group of parents that raise money to help set up tutoring programs for students and additional programs for underserved populations at BHS. Slemp also made efforts to support students’ voices.

Leyva-Cutler said she saw this in her experiences with Slemp at meetings. “He also opened up the space for students’ voice at the table with respect and that it wasn’t just to have them at the table, but to also be open about what their and their classmates’ experience was at BHS,” Leyva-Cutler added.

According to Kavaler, Slemp made the school safe educationally, physically and emotionally for everyone and the school became a better place because of him.

“He brought trust back to the school climate and mentored the next principal of BHS that continued this legacy,” Leyva-Cutler said in the email. “He modeled how important it is … (to) create trust in their leadership style with their school community.

Contact Robson Swift at rswift@dailycal.org and follow him on Twitter at @swift_robson.

The Daily Californian

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UC Berkeley professor receives award from National Academy of Sciences https://www.dailycal.org/2020/01/23/uc-berkeley-professor-receives-award-from-national-academy-of-sciences/ https://www.dailycal.org/2020/01/23/uc-berkeley-professor-receives-award-from-national-academy-of-sciences/#respond Fri, 24 Jan 2020 06:39:44 +0000 https://www.dailycal.org/?p=527006 UC Berkeley professor receives award from National Academy of Sciences

Christina Maslach, UC Berkeley psychology professor emerita and a professor of the campus graduate school of psychology, earned the National Academy of Sciences, or NAS, Award for Scientific Reviewing for her research in job burnout and worker well-being.
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UC Berkeley professor receives award from National Academy of Sciences

Tanya Zimbardo/Courtesy

Christina Maslach, UC Berkeley psychology professor emerita and a professor of the campus graduate school of psychology, earned the National Academy of Sciences, or NAS, Award for Scientific Reviewing for her research in job burnout and worker well-being.

The NAS, a nonprofit dedicated to promoting and recognizing scientific discovery, announced the honor Wednesday. Maslach was one of 15 scientists in the country to receive an award from the NAS this year. 

“What professor Maslach is being lauded for is 40 years of research that advanced our understanding of worker well-being,” said Rhona Weinstein, a professor of the campus graduate school of psychology.

This particular award is awarded for scientific reviewing, which guides the next steps in scientific research for a particular field, according to Weinstein.

Through decades of research, Maslach helped establish a scientific definition for job burnout, which she defines as a psychological experience consisting of a physical and emotional stress response, a negative sense of self and a cynicism that results in decreased work ethic.

As a newly hired UC Berkeley faculty member in the 1970s, Maslach first discovered the concept of burnout while conducting interviews with people as part of an effort to establish a new research program. Multiple interviewees mentioned the concept of burnout, which was not commonly understood at the time, according to Maslach.

“And gradually, what I began to realize is that there was kind of some common threads in all of these different stories,” Maslach said.

In 1981, Maslach published a measurement called the Maslach Burnout Inventory, or MBI, which is currently considered the standard for assessing burnout. Maslach has since used the MBI in her own research.

Last year, the World Health Organization legitimized the concept of job burnout by establishing it as an occupational issue, according to Maslach. The public health agency used the definition of job burnout that Maslach and her colleagues developed.

Maslach said she was not aware of this particular award from the NAS, and it was not on her radar prior to being notified that she had won.

“I didn’t know I was nominated,” Maslach said. “So that’s why it was as a bit of a surprise. It wasn’t something I knew about.”

Maslach will be honored at the NAS’ 157th annual meeting in April.

Now a retired professor, Maslach is focused on finding solutions to job burnout in the workplace.

“I’ve got my fingers crossed that that will be the more long-lasting impact of both the World Health Organization statement and this award … coming from a prestigious scientific thing is saying this is serious, this is solid, this is … really something important to pay attention to,” Maslach said.

Emma Rooholfada is the lead research and ideas reporter. Contact her at erooholfada@dailycal.org and follow her on Twitter at @erooholfada_dc.

The Daily Californian

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Berkeley school district meeting addresses future funding, assisting underprivileged students https://www.dailycal.org/2020/01/23/berkeley-school-district-meeting-addresses-future-funding-assisting-underprivileged-students/ https://www.dailycal.org/2020/01/23/berkeley-school-district-meeting-addresses-future-funding-assisting-underprivileged-students/#respond Fri, 24 Jan 2020 07:15:43 +0000 https://www.dailycal.org/?p=526988 Berkeley school district meeting addresses future funding, assisting underprivileged students

At Tuesday night’s Berkeley Unified School District’s, or BUSD’s, meeting, members discussed revising the English Learner, or EL, master plan, California Gov. Gavin Newsom’s new budget proposal and drafting a new Local Control and Accountability Plan, or LCAP.
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Berkeley school district meeting addresses future funding, assisting underprivileged students

Kaleo Mark/Staff

At Tuesday night’s Berkeley Unified School District’s, or BUSD’s, meeting, members discussed revising the English Learner, or EL, master plan, California Gov. Gavin Newsom’s new budget proposal and drafting a new Local Control and Accountability Plan, or LCAP.

The meeting began with public comment, during which several BUSD students and parents spoke in support of modifying the district’s EL master plan

Andrea Calderon, a teacher at Sylvia Mendez Elementary School, voiced her concerns over insufficient funds and said she believes an updated EL master plan would provide the guidance needed to better support EL students.

“We as a district need to come together to develop a plan that best serves our English learners and supports them and is not a hindrance,” Calderon said at the meeting. “The demands on our teachers and students are not backed up by the support they need to be truly successful.”

Soon afterward, BUSD Assistant Superintendent Pauline Follansbee presented an analysis of Newsom’s new budget proposal. Lower than anticipated cost-of-living adjustment, or COLA, funds — which are allocated by Newsom’s budget — may account for approximately $1.3 million in budget reductions over the next two years, according to the report.

BUSD board member Judy Appel said she believes other districts are also having funding shortfalls and that Newsom’s budget will not fully address the issue.

Later in the meeting, BUSD Superintendent Brent Stephens discussed the district’s 2020-23 planning process for LCAP — a tool for local educational agencies to support “high-need” students, and in particular, Black students and their families.

“I’m really appreciative to see this new African American success framework because it shows that it is something that our district values,” said BUSD board member Ka’Dijah Brown at the meeting. “I think that African American students and the challenges they face are sometimes swept under a rug.”

Kaleo Mark is a schools and communities reporter. Contact him at kmark@dailycal.org and follow him on Twitter at @kaleomark_dc.

The Daily Californian

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Berkeley police identify suspect from fatal collision incident https://www.dailycal.org/2020/01/25/berkeley-police-identify-suspect-from-fatal-collision-incident/ https://www.dailycal.org/2020/01/25/berkeley-police-identify-suspect-from-fatal-collision-incident/#respond Sun, 26 Jan 2020 00:03:54 +0000 https://www.dailycal.org/?p=527164 Berkeley police identify suspect from fatal collision incident

A fatal collision occurred at University Avenue and Sixth Street on Jan. 20, investigators identified the suspect of the incident as Alexander McGee.
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Berkeley police identify suspect from fatal collision incident

A fatal collision occurred at the intersection of University Avenue and Sixth Street on Jan. 20 and resulted in the death of a 58-year-old woman, according to a Nixle Alert.

At about 10:30 a.m., a UCPD officer was driving in the area of Sixth Street and saw a man inside a parked vehicle violently attacking a female passenger, according to the Nixle Alert. The officer heard the female passenger screaming for help and tried to intervene.

The suspect then drove away with the officer following the suspect vehicle. In a series of turns, the suspect vehicle drove onto the sidewalk, colliding into a pedestrian before driving off onto the freeway. About seven police cars were at the scene with police tape bordering the area at about 11:30 a.m.

According to the Nixle Alert, many community members have contacted the Berkeley Police Department since the incident. BPD investigators were able to identify the suspect of the incident as 29-year-old Alexander McGee.

The Nixle Alert added that BPD officers searched two North Oakland locations for McGee on Jan. 24, however, McGee was able to avoid arrest. McGee is wanted for vehicular manslaughter, hit and run causing death, felony domestic violence, violation of his probation and has two preexisting warrants for his arrest from Contra Costa County.

McGee is considered armed, dangerous and known for fleeing or fighting police, according to the Nixle Alert. BPD recommends the public to not approach or contact McGee if he is seen, but to immediately contact emergency services.

Thao Nguyen is a deputy news editor. Contact her at tnguyen@dailycal.org and follow her on Twitter at @tnguyen_dc.

The Daily Californian

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Protesters oppose Mauna Kea telescope at UC regents meeting https://www.dailycal.org/2020/01/24/protesters-oppose-mauna-kea-telescope-at-uc-regents-meeting/ https://www.dailycal.org/2020/01/24/protesters-oppose-mauna-kea-telescope-at-uc-regents-meeting/#respond Fri, 24 Jan 2020 09:24:53 +0000 https://www.dailycal.org/?p=527029 Protesters oppose Mauna Kea telescope at UC regents meeting

About 80 protesters gathered at a UC Board of Regents meeting Thursday to demand that the UC system divests from the Thirty Meter Telescope, or TMT, project on Mauna Kea — a mountain that is sacred to Native Hawaiians.
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The Daily Californian

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Protesters oppose Mauna Kea telescope at UC regents meeting

Matt Gibson/File

About 80 protesters gathered at a UC Board of Regents meeting Thursday to demand that the UC system divests from the Thirty Meter Telescope, or TMT, project on Mauna Kea — a mountain that is sacred to Native Hawaiians.

These protesters consisted of the Mauna Kea Protectors, students from various schools within the UC system, Bay Area residents and some Native Hawaiians from the state itself, according to UC Santa Cruz Mauna Kea Protectors member Karli DeRego. The group gathered around 8 a.m. and spoke at the meeting to express its concerns about the UC system investing in TMT, according to Mauna Kea Protectors at UC Berkeley organizer Sarah Bancroft.

“We’re here to inform you that the people of Hawaii will not accept this anymore,” said Joshua Lanakila Mangauil, an organizer of the protest. “I ask this body to reinstill that money … and take care of your own students.”

The TMT International Observatory is a partnership between the UC system and the California Institute of Technology, as well as other organizations from Japan, China, India and Canada. Mangauil alleged that India, one of the partners in the project, said it wanted the TMT project moved away from Mauna Kea.

The protesters then went outside to hold a press conference and read a letter written by the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. DeRego, along with Ashley Garelick from Intersectional Feminists at UC Santa Barbara and Angeli Noelle Cabrera from the UC Santa Barbara Pacific Islander Student Association, read excerpts from the letter aloud.

“Accordingly, the committee requests the state party to provide information on the steps taken to … ensure the right to consultation and free, prior and informed consent to Native Hawaiians affected by projects on or near their ancestral lands and territories,” stated the letter. “Consider the suspension of the Thirty Meter Telescope project. … Consider adopting concrete measures to effectively protect the sacred sites of indigenous peoples.”

Mangauil then led the group in an “aha” protocol, a traditional Native Hawaiian ritual practice, after a member of a local indigenous community spoke and prayed for the success of the Mauna Kea protesters. For the next hour, Mangauil played a massive drum and chanted while the other protesters repeated his chants and danced traditional dances. Some bystanders joined in the dancing, and some protesters took their shoes off.

At the end of the rally, Mangauil spoke to the crowd and explained the purpose of them demonstrating for Mauna Kea. He spoke of transforming systems that are “not serving” the people and of the importance of fighting for one’s community.

“Call that mana,” Mangauil said. “Face that fire.” Then, with a closing song, the protest concluded.

TMT would be one of the world’s most powerful telescopes and would be able to provide images 10 times sharper than those from the Hubble Space Telescope, according to UC Office of the President spokesperson Stett Holbrook.

TMT has collaborated with the Hawaiian community for more than 10 years to address cultural, environmental, educational and economic issues, Holbrook said in an email. Holbrook added that UC Board of Regents chair John Pérez wanted the discussion of the TMT project to come before the full board.

“The TIO and its individual partners have a longstanding history of advancing astronomy on Hawaii Island and have worked diligently for more than a decade to engage community members, the local business community and the state in finding a peaceful path forward on Maunakea,” Holbrook said in the email. “TMT remains committed to integrating science and culture, providing the best possible stewardship, enriching the local economy and supporting educational opportunities as it enables this global scientific endeavor.”

Contact Olivia González Britt and Megha Krishnan at newsdesk@dailycal.org.

The Daily Californian

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